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Posts from October, 2016

What Are You Grateful For

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, October 25th, 2016

I am reminded everyday for everything that I have to be grateful for. Today, I am adding this magnificent view to my gratitude list. What will you add to your list today?

For more information on caring for our minds, bodies and spirits, visit SelfCare for Healthcare.

Life Balance: Finding Relaxation

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, October 21st, 2016

When is the last time that you swayed, relaxed, breathed deeply and allowed yourself to renew and replenish? That is exactly what I am doing right now–and why I bought this hammock to help. How will you find your relaxation place? You deserve it!

To learn how to care for yourself as you care for others visit SelfCare for HealthCare at http://www.leannthieman.com/selfcare-…. Contact me today to discuss implementing this powerful program at your facility.

Selfcare: Exercise Reduces Risk of Heart Disease!

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, October 18th, 2016

Younger women who practice selfcare and exercise just 2 ½ hours a week may cut their risk for heart disease by up to 25%.

young-women-exercisingThe choices they make in the first half of their lives determine their well-being and health in the second half, according to a study from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore.

Higher levels of physical activity have been shown to reduce heart disease, stroke, cancers, diabetes and many other chronic health conditions.

Researchers collected data on more than 97,000 women, aged 27 to 44, who took part in the Nurses’ Health Study 2.They proved that women who were the most physically active during their leisure time had the lowest risk for heart disease , 25% lower than women who exercised the least. Even moderate exercise, such as taking a brisk walk, was associated with a lower risk of heart disease. Women who seemed to benefit the most exercised the most, at least 150 minutes a week. And, it didn’t matter what weight a woman was when she started exercising.

Many young women are often so busy caring for others, they don’t take time to exercise and care for themselves. Yet they are often the gatekeepers of health for their families. So when women are healthier, so are families, communities and our world.

To learn how to care for yourself as you care for others visit SelfCare for HealthCareContact me today to discuss implementing this powerful program at your facility.

Young Men Must Reduce Stress & Practice Selfcare!

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, October 13th, 2016

Young men who get stressed out easily appear to have a greater risk of high blood pressure later in life, all the more reason for good selfcare habits now!

stressed-young-manResearchers found that, among 18-year-old men, those who had the lowest stress-resilience scores were 40% more likely to develop high blood pressure later than those with the greatest ability to cope with stress.

They also found that being overweight was linked with an even greater risk of developing high blood pressure.

The research was based on data from more than 1.5 million men who joined the Swedish army between 1969 and 1997 at age 18. Their health was followed until the end of 2012. None of them had high blood pressure when they entered the military and all were assessed then for their ability to handle stress. Their body mass index (BMI), which is an estimate of body fat based on height and weight, was measured too.

Men who had low stress-resilience scores and a high BMI at age 18 had a more than tripled risk of high blood pressure later in life.

To learn how to reduce stress and care for yourself as you care for others visit SelfCare for HealthCareContact me today to discuss implementing this powerful program at your facility.

Baby Boomer Nurses Retiring

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, October 11th, 2016

Around a million registered nurses are older than 50, meaning one-third of the current nursing workforce will reach retirement age in the next 10 to 15 years. More than half a million are projected to retire by 2022…that’s 6 years from now!

Baby boomer nursesMany nurses postponed retiring during the downturn in the economy, but now they are starting. But filling those vacancies isn’t a simple one-for-one proposition. Nearly 158,000 new nursing graduates entered the workforce in 2014, a substantial increase from a decade before. But the nursing education system hasn’t kept pace. According to an American Association of Colleges of Nursing report, U.S. nursing schools turned away 79,659 qualified applicants from baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in 2012 due to insufficient number of faculty, clinical sites, classroom space, clinical preceptors, and budget constraints. Adding to the problem is that many nursing faculty are approaching retirement!

Most nursing faculty require a doctoral degree, and can’t be quickly or easily replaced.

To learn how to recruit nurses and retain nurses visit SelfCare for HealthCareContact me today to discuss implementing this powerful program at your facility.

More Registered Nurses Decrease Mortality Rates

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, October 6th, 2016

Hospitals with more registered nurses and doctors per bed can reduce patient death by as much as 20 percent, according to researchers in England.

Having more nurses and doctors overall is not enough, as researchers found having more unregistered nurses increased the death rate at hospitals.

registered nurseThe researchers focused on cost-cutting measures, either reducing staff or hiring unregistered healthcare support workers to reduce workload, as at fault for some part of mortality rates.

For the study, published in the British Medical Journal, researchers reviewed administrative data from 137 acute care trusts in the United Kingdom’s National Health Service, as well as surveys of 2,917 registered nurses at 31 of the trusts, which included 46 hospitals and 401 wards.

The researchers found death rates were 20% lower when nurses were responsible for six or fewer patients, as compared to nurses responsible for 10 or more patients.

The researchers caution the study does not show a cause-and-effect scenario, but indicates more careful staffing with an emphasis on training could help reduce mortality rates.

To learn how to recruit nurses and retain nurses visit SelfCare for HealthCareContact me today to discuss implementing this powerful program at your facility.

Employee Wellness: Save Money, Reduce Employee Stress

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, October 4th, 2016

Today, 78% of employers think stress is an issue among their employees, manifested in lower engagement, increased absence, lower productivity, and low participation and success rates in employee wellness programs.employee-wellness-stress

Employers are realizing it saves money when they reduce employee stress, offering programs to determine root causes of stress, and providing tools to help them be more resilient.

Highly resilient workers report 46% less stress. Twice as many employees with low resilience reported one to three absences in the past month than those with high resiliency. Individuals with low resilience are twice as likely quit in six months. Those with high resiliency are four times more highly satisfied with their jobs. Employees with low resilience are more than twice as likely to be overweight.

To learn how to an employee wellness program can create happier, less stressed, more engaged employees with higher productivity, lower healthcare costs, and less absenteeism, visit SelfCare for HealthCareContact me today to discuss implementing this powerful program at your facility.