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Posts from November, 2013

Do Nurses Working Night Shifts Have Long-Term Brain Impairment?

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 26th, 2013

Most past studies have suggested that working a mix of day and night shifts disrupts circadian rhythms – changes in the mind and body that follow a 24-hour cycle. Researchers have thought those disruptions could speed up brain aging.

Dr. Elizabeth E. Devore led a study at the Channing Division of Network Medicine of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

The researchers looked at data from the Nurses’ Health Study, a long-term study that began in 1976. The current analysis included more than 16,000 female nurses who reported on their history of night-shift work in 1988, when they were between the ages of 58 and 68.

Women who reported rotating night shifts for many years tended to be heavier and have less education than other women. But they scored similarly on the thinking and memory tests, the researchers wrote in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

While long-term brain impairment isn’t a proven issue, other studies have tied shift work to chronic diseases like cancer, heart disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes, Devore said.

All nurses need to care for their minds, bodies and spirits. To learn life balance tools to share with your nurses and healthcare staff, check out my SelfCare for HealthCare™ program. Please CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to bring this powerful, life-changing gift to your employees.

Nurse Retention and Nurse Recruitment: Yes, There’s Still a Nursing Shortage

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 21st, 2013

 

Life Balance: For Physical Health, Who Needs a Gym?

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 19th, 2013

Despite a gyms bulging with weight-lifting equipment, some fitness experts suggest the only thing people need to push, pull and lift is the weight of their own body.

Bret Contreras, author of “Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy,” says once the person masters the simpler version of a push-up, squat, or chin-up, a more advanced version can be tackled, often with a little help from the living room furniture.

“Find things in the environment: a table to get underneath, hold on to the sides of and then pull the body upward; a rafter for a pull-up,” he said. “To work your glutes (buttocks muscles), all you need is a couch.”

Contreras recommends the beginner start with 15 minutes a day and increase over time.

“It doesn’t have to be intimidating,” he said. “You could do a 20-minute workout three times a week and have an incredible physique, so long as you push hard and keep challenging yourself.”

Jessica Matthews, an exercise physiologist with the American Council on Exercise, said bodyweight training blends with the trend toward functional training, or training that mimics the way we move in everyday life, as opposed to the older bodybuilder model of targeting one muscle group at a time.

“Our body is one kinetic chain, everything moves together, so most everyday exercises will move multiple muscle groups,” she said.

To learn how to care for your body, mind and spirit, in just 15 minutes a day, let’s talk about my SelfCare for HealthCare™ program. Please CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to bring this powerful, life-changing gift to your employees.

Living Your Priorities and Walking the Talk…With Toes in the Sand!

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 14th, 2013

Employee Health Programs Boost Productivity

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 12th, 2013

Employee wellness programs are more important than ever, both because the new Affordable Care Act includes incentives for them and because they provide huge savings. A study published in the October 2013 issue of ACOEM’s Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine shows further evidence of the payoffs.

The study is from a program in which wellness coaches provided telephone support to help employees address health problems or risk factors. The program cut lost work time by approximately 10.3 hours per year and saved an average of about $350 for each participating employee.

There is a growing body of evidence proving that participating in health promotion programs can help improve productivity and save money for employers.

To create healthier employees and learn strategies for nurse retention and nurse recruitment go to SelfCare for HealthCare™. Please CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Nurse Staffing Ratios Increasing Need for Nurse Recruitment and Nurse Retention

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 7th, 2013

Nurse staffing ratio laws may increase the number of positions available in hospitals, said Brannen Betz, general manager of Aureus Medical Group, a national nurse staffing company.

According to the American Nurses Association, 15 states have enacted legislation or adopted regulations to address nurse staffing. Many states are moving toward mandating nurse-to-patient ratios. This will require more nurses to fill those positions and up the need for effective nurse recruitment and nurse retention.

To implement the best  strategies for nurse retention and nurse recruitment visit SelfCare for HealthCare™. CONTACT ME TODAY  to talk about customizing this powerful, year-long program for your employees.

More Nurse Recruitment and Nurse Retention Required Due to Healthcare Reform

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 5th, 2013

Although recessions and salary changes tend to be cyclical, the future is less predictable with the convergence of several national trends.

“The first factor is the real impact healthcare reform will have, and a lot of that is relatively unknown,” said Terry Bennett, RN, MS, CHCR, president of the National Association for Health Care Recruitment, based in Lenexa, Kan. “Organizations are struggling to predict the impact of decreasing physician and Medicare reimbursements, and they are really trying to maintain financial security. They are not giving the same type of market adjustments that they used to (give nurses), and some are decreasing the amount of merit increases given to nurses.”

In addition, the supply of nurses has increased in the past decade as nursing school graduates join baby boomers still on the job. The baby boomers have been more career-focused than any generation preceding them, and they might not fully retire even when the recession lifts.

However, other factors could increase demand for nurses and drive up salaries. As the economy improves and as the Affordable Care Act allows more people with insurance to seek healthcare, the demand for nurses could go up. Also, as Baby Boomers age and require more healthcare, they will also drive up demand for services.

To learn effective strategies for nurse retention and nurse recruitment visit SelfCare for HealthCare™. CONTACT ME TODAY  to talk about customizing this powerful, year-long program for your employees.