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Posts from August, 2013

Nurse Retention and Recruitment News: Veterans Can Help End Nursing Shortage

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, August 29th, 2013

Military medics and other veterans with healthcare experience or training can pursue nursing careers. The U.S Department of Health and Human Services has announced a new program to help veterans earn BSNs by “building on their unique skills and abilities,” according to an HHS news release.

Administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration, an agency of HHS, the Veterans’ Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program will fund up to nine cooperative agreements of up to $350,000 a year. Funding of $3 million is expected to be awarded by the end of fiscal year 2013 (Sept. 30).

Program funding will go to accredited schools of nursing to increase veterans’ enrollment in and completion of baccalaureate nursing programs, and to explore ways to award academic credit for prior military healthcare experience or training. The institutions also will train faculty to provide mentorships and other supportive services.

“The program recognizes the skills, experience and sacrifices of our veterans, while helping to grow our nursing workforce. It helps veterans formalize their skills to get jobs, while strengthening Americans’ access to care,” a spokesperson said.

The program is described as a step forward in addressing needs identified in the White House report, “The Fast Track to Civilian Employment: Streamlining Credentialing and Licensing for Service Members, Veterans, and Their Spouses,” which was issued in February.

What a great way to thank and honor our veterans while helping to ease the impending nursing shortage!

To learn nurse retention and nurse recruitment strategies, go to SelfCare for HealthCare. You can also CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Nurse Retention News: What Makes Healthcare Workers Stay?

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, August 27th, 2013

The new survey by recruiting firm CareerBuilder asked healthcare workers who planned to stay in their jobs what factors most compelled them not to leave. The number one factor healthcare workers pointed to was a sense of fulfillment. This stat is important when considering your nurse retention efforts. The breakdown of most important factors are:

– I find my work satisfying and rewarding – 57%

– I enjoy my colleagues – 54%

– Location is ideal – 53%

– Compensation, benefits and perks – 51%

– Flexible work schedules – 44%

To learn how to make healthcare work more satisfying and rewarding and increase nurse retention and nurse recruitment, go to SelfCare for HealthCare. You can also CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Nurse Retention: Nursing Workforce Growing to Meet the Nursing Shortage

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, August 22nd, 2013

A new government report suggests that the nursing workforce is in a better position now to meet future health care needs than it was 10 years ago.

The nursing workforce is larger, more highly educated and more diverse, according to a study released by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).

There are 2.74 million nurses practicing in the United States, and about 500,000 of them are expected to retire by 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. By then the nation will need to prepare 1.2 million more nurses to meet projected needs, due to increased demand and nurses retiring or leaving the field.

The good news is that the nursing workforce grew substantially in the last decade. In the 2000s, the number of registered nurses (RNs) grew 24%, and the number of licensed practical nurses (LPNs) grew 15.5%. Notably, that growth rate outpaced population growth; the number of registered nurses per capita grew 14% in the last decade.

There were also more nurses on the verge of entering the workforce, or in the so-called nursing pipeline. In 2011, more than 142,000 new nurse graduates passed the national licensure examination, up from about 69,000 in 2001.

More nurses also chose to advance their education, which will help provide the highly skilled care needed to treat an increasing patient population. At the beginning of the decade, 50% of the nation’s nurses had a bachelor’s degree or higher; at its end, the percentage had climbed to 55%.

The HRSA study shows rapid growth in the number of bachelor’s-prepared nurses in the future. The number of graduate nurses with bachelor’s degrees taking licensure exams for the first time more than doubled between 2001 and 2011.

The nursing workforce is also slowly becoming more diverse. The percentage of non-white RNs rose from 20 to 25% over the past decade. And the percentage of men in the profession crept up about 1 percentage point, to 9%.

For tactics and tips on how to increase nurse retention and nurse recruitment, go to SelfCare for HealthCare. You can also CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Having Trouble Reaching Your Workplace Goals? Adjust Your Attitude!

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, August 20th, 2013

What Increases Nurse Job Satisfaction and Nurse Retention?

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, August 15th, 2013

Nurses have to do more with less these days. Given heightened stress levels and workloads, it’s not surprising that healthcare employers said their top staffing challenge for 2013 was lifting employee morale (34%), followed by retaining top talent (33%), finding skill workers (32%) and offering competitive compensation (30%).

34% of healthcare employers said they currently have open positions for which they can’t find qualified candidates. Among healthcare organizations with more than 50 employees, that number is 43%.

Workers reported that the key factors that influence job satisfaction and retention are:

• Work/life balance – 18% of workers said they are dissatisfied with their work/life balance, and when asked what is preventing them from having that balance, the highest percentage cited a workload that is too heavy (44%), followed by their employer’s unwillingness to provide flexible work schedules (21%).

• Pay – 75% of healthcare workers say they do not earn their desired salary – with 29% saying not anywhere near it. While 44% say they received a merit raise in 2012, 17% say they haven’t received one since before 2008. Four in ten health care workers (41%) say they have not received a cost-of-living increase since before 2008.

• Career advancement – Nearly a quarter (24%) of healthcare workers are not satisfied with their career progress. A lack of upward mobility was also one of the top reasons why healthcare workers decided to look for employment opportunities.

• Switching Industries – Nearly three in ten (29%) healthcare workers say they are currently trying to acquire skills in a new industry or field. Of these workers, 54% are going back to school, 18% are volunteering, and 7% are taking on temporary or contract work.

To learn how to bring life balance to your nurses, increase retention and nurse recruitment, go to SelfCare for HealthCare. CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Do You Turn Around When Your Destination Is Not in Clear Sight?

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, August 13th, 2013

Nurse Retention: Nurses Burnout from Reduced Staffing

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, August 8th, 2013

Smaller staffs, heavy patient loads, and higher stress levels contribute to burnout among healthcare workers, according to a new survey by recruiting firm CareerBuilder. A high rate of burnout negatively affects nurse retention.

Harris Interactive conducted the online survey for CareerBuilder between February 11 and March 6, 2013, from over 500 U.S. healthcare workers and more than 240 U.S. healthcare employers.

34% of healthcare workers plan to look for a new job in 2013, up from 24% last year. Nearly half (45%) plan to look for a new job over the next two years. 82% said that while they are not actively looking for a job today, they would be open to a new position if they came across the right opportunity.

Jason Lovelace, president of CareerBuilder Healthcare, said in a statement. “Nearly half – 46% – of healthcare organizations said they have seen a negative impact on their organizations due to extended job vacancies. Long hours and juggling multiple patient needs are taking their toll on morale and retention. The survey shows healthcare workers are seeking a more manageable work experience.”

Patient care is affected when staff becoming more stressed as they cover positions open for extended periods of time. 60% of healthcare workers say they are burned out on their jobs. 21% always or often feel burned out. Of workers who feel always or often burned out, 67% plan to look for a new job this year.

To learn strategies to reduce stress and burnout for your nurses and increase nurse retention and nurse recruitment go to SelfCare for HealthCare. CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

 

Nurse Retention: How Do We Retain Nurses When They Are Verbally Abused?

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, August 6th, 2013

Nurse Retention and Recruitment through Scholarship and Loan Repayment Programs

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, August 1st, 2013

The Department of Health and Human Services has made significant investments in building the nursing workforce through scholarship and loan repayment programs. The National Health Service Corps (www.nhsc.hrsa.gov), which offers scholarship and loan repayment in return for practice in underserved areas, has grown from 3,600 in 2008 to nearly 10,000 in 2012 and includes more than 1,600 nurses.

The Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program (www.hrsa.gov/loanscholarships/repayment/nursing), which includes approximately 3,000 RNs and APRNs, helped repay the loans of more than 700 nurses in fiscal year 2012. The group included 506 nurses at critical shortage facilities and 214 nurse faculty at accredited eligible schools of nursing; 86% percent of the awards were made to nurses working in areas of the country where their services are most needed.

With millions more people getting more and better healthcare, many more nurses are needed. To learn strategies for nurse retention, nurse recruitment, bringing self care to your facility and how to increase work life balance for nurses and healthcare professionals, go to SelfCare for HealthCare. CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.