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Posts from February, 2013

Nurse Recruitment Tool: The Rose Bowl Parade!

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, February 28th, 2013

Sally Bixby, RN, MS, CNOR, was the first nurse—and the second woman—in history to serve as president of the Tournament of Roses, a 100 year old celebration of flowers and football in California on the first day of every year. Bixby’s presidency inspired area nurses to create a float to thank nurses for the work they do, educate the public about the role of nurses in health care, and encourage more people to join our profession. They plan to provide nursing scholarships with funds raised beyond what was needed for the float.

Bixby, who appeared in the parade riding a 1940’s era glamour car with her husband, and the nurse-themed float, drew considerable attention. Every year, 70 million viewers from 200 countries tune in to watch the Rose Parade. It is the third most watched television event in the country.

The nurses float, called “A Healing Place”, featured words inscribed on its base such as caring, commitment, compassion, confidence, conscientiousness, and intelligence. Ten nurses representing diverse backgrounds and disciplines rode the float.

What a great way to call attention to our great profession, and a great way to recruit nurses!

To learn more about nurse recruitment and nurse retention strategies, and how to increase work life balance for nurses and healthcare professionals, go to SelfCare for HealthCare. CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Nurse Recruitment Tool: Hospitals Recruit Nurses with BSN

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, February 26th, 2013

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) released preliminary survey data showing that enrollment in all types of professional nursing programs increased from 2011 to 2012. It also noted a 3.5% increase in entry-level Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs. AACN’s annual survey findings were based on data reported from 664 of the 856 nursing schools in the U.S. with baccalaureate and/or graduate programs. In a separate survey they found a strong hiring preference for new nurses prepared at the baccalaureate level as well as a comparatively high job-placement rate for new BSN graduates.

The AACN survey shows that the number of students enrolled in baccalaureate degree completion programs, called RN to BSN programs, increased by 22.2% from 2011 to 2012. It also shows that enrollment in master’s and doctoral degree nursing programs increased significantly. Nursing schools with master’s programs reported an 8.2% jump in enrollments. In doctoral nursing programs, the greatest growth was in Doctor of Nursing Practice where enrollment increased by 19.6%.

In addition to its annual survey, AACN collected data on the employment of new graduates from entry-level programs (baccalaureate and master’s). The survey found that baccalaureate nursing graduates are more than twice as likely to have jobs when they graduate as graduates in other fields.

AACN queried nursing schools to find out if hospitals and other employers are expressing a preference for hiring new nurses with bachelor’s degrees. The results showed that 39.1% of employers require the BSN for new hires, while 77.4% strongly prefer BSN-prepared nurses.

To learn more about nurse recruitment and nurse retention strategies, and how to increase work life balance for nurses and healthcare professionals, go to SelfCare for HealthCare. CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

 

 

Use Mentors as a Nurse Retention Tool

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, February 21st, 2013

Mentors are critical in helping young nurse faculty meet the demands of work and family. Mentors play a key role in enabling their success. They show mentees how to find resources, help them write grant applications, publish scholarly articles, and refine research goals. They also help with life outside the classroom, offering advice about career advancement and work-life balance. Overall, mentors are a great nurse retention tool.

Angela McBride, PhD, RN, FAAN, chair of the National Advisory Committee of the RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars (NFS) program, wrote the book on the value of mentoring in nursing. The Growth and Development of Nurse Leaders serves as a “literary mentor” for aspiring nurse leaders.

Mentoring is an ongoing, collaborative relationship between two individuals. The senior partner helps the less-experienced individual grow in his or her field, and benefits from the satisfaction of helping a younger colleague.

It’s not just mentors and mentees who benefit, however. The entire profession does, as well as patients and their families, too, according to a report on the future of nursing released by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2010. Mentoring, the report found, is a good way to strengthen the nursing workforce and improve the quality of care and patient outcomes.

Mentoring also helps health care organizations and academic institutions retain nurses and nurse educators, which can curb a shortage of nurses and faculty. About one in five nurses will leave their jobs within the first year, and more than one in two will leave within seven years, according to the RN Work Project, a national study of new nurses funded by RWJF.

To learn more about nurse recruitment and nurse retention strategies, and how to increase work life balance for nurses and healthcare professionals, check out my new SelfCare for HealthCare program. CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Nurse Recruitment: Hope for New Nurse Graduates

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, February 19th, 2013

Fifteen years ago there were a hundred hospitals in New Jersey. Today there are seventy, and it is anticipated there will be even fewer in the future. 60% of nurses are employed in hospitals, so when there are fewer hospitals, there are fewer nursing positions, and nurse recruitment suffers.

The economic downturn is another factor in the hiring of new nurses.

When the recession began, many nurses who normally would have retired did not, and many of those who worked part-time or had retired went back to work because of financial challenges in their families.

As the economy improves, more and more older nurses will retire. The average age of a nurse is 47.

We must all encourage new grads looking for jobs, so we don’t lose them from nursing. The challenge for some with a two year degree is that many hospitals are asking for a BSN degree. It is important for nurses to look at their long-term goals because we will have a nursing exodus and a shortage in the years to come. Instead of only looking for a job in a hospital, nursing grads should expand their horizons. That might mean working in long term care, for the Red Cross, or possibly going to go back to school to be more employable with a 4 year degree.

To learn more about nurse recruitment and nurse retention strategies, and how to increase work life balance for nurses and healthcare professionals, go to my new SelfCare for HealthCare program. CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Nurse Recruitment and Nurse Retention Tool: Stop Disruptive Behaviors

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, February 12th, 2013

Unfortunately, tension between colleagues and other disruptive behavior is a common problem in healthcare settings. It’s more than just a work annoyance; it negatively affects both nurse retention and nurse recruitment.

According to a joint study conducted by the Studer Group and the Center for Patient and Professional Advocacy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn., three in four healthcare providers experienced some kind of disruptive or intimidating behavior in the course of their work.

A full 66% of respondents stated they have considered leaving their jobs and 41% transferred out of a department as a result of unprofessional behavior. The problem spans the entire spectrum of clinical and non-clinical workers and medical staff.

Too often patients witness this discord. They rightly wonder, “If that’s how they treat each other, how will they treat me?”

Bullying and in-fighting have a major effect on recruitment. Leaders are hesitant to place new nurses or students on floors with a notoriously mean staff. This is finally being addressed and workers are starting to be fired for the way they treat each other. They should be terminated because this behavior can impact the way they care for patients and it makes the work environment difficult for everyone, especially for new grads.

To learn more about nurse recruitment and nurse retention strategies, and how to increase work life balance for nurses and healthcare professionals, go to my new SelfCare for HealthCare program. CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Nurse Retention Tool: Increase Patient Satisfaction through Quick Response

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, February 7th, 2013

Despite the most advanced nurse alert systems that are often routed to the clinician’s cell phone and the practice of hourly rounding, the issue of unanswered call lights is still far from resolved. When patient satisfaction is high, nurses are happy, and nurse retention flourishes.

Nurses are often so busy caring for their own patients, they are reluctant to take time to answer another’s call light. The sad shame is that the vast majority of requests don’t require a doctor or master’s-prepared nurse, and these patients can be easily helped by providing simple comfort measures.

Because of the direct correlation with patient falls, hospitals are launching call light answering initiatives throughout the country. Yet healthcare workers say that high patient ratios and the lack of time prevent them from responding quickly. The association between unanswered call lights and poor patient satisfaction scores means hospitals will continue taking a hard line on response times.

To learn more about how to increase patient satisfaction scores, increase work life balance for nurses and healthcare professionals, and nurse recruitment and nurse retention strategies, go to my new SelfCare for HealthCare program. CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Nurse Retention Tool: Fire Poor Workers!

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, February 5th, 2013

Modern health systems spend a great deal of time and money on creating patient-centered environments, but unfortunately most patients remember only the most unprofessional healthcare workers they encounter.

In any industry, there are always those co-workers who spend disproportionate amounts of time on cell phones or online, spread conflict among staff, or refuse to perform certain aspects of the job. Healthcare is different in that poor behavior by one member of the team can affect patient outcomes or cause a safety issue. Keeping poor quality workers also has a negative impact on nurse retention of the best workers.

Nurse leaders need to have a zero-tolerance of these behaviors because that negativity spreads like a cancer. Coworkers quit or ask to be transferred when subjected to these poor standards of care.

To learn more about nurse recruitment and nurse retention strategies, and how to increase work life balance for nurses and healthcare professionals, go to my new SelfCare for HealthCare program. After you take a look, CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.

Nurse Recruitment Tool: Achieve Magnet Recognition

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, February 4th, 2013

While the number of organizations seeking Magnet status has increased almost steadily since 2001, to date only 7% of U.S. hospitals have achieved it. This is a sad statistic, being that achieving Magnet status is a valuable nurse recruitment tool.

Why not more hospitals? Is it possible finances are an impediment to achieving Magnet recognition, or is it the voluminous documentation required to apply?

Despite the global recession, most experts believe the cost of applying for and completing the application for Magnet isn’t a factor because the focus of Magnet is consistent with the overall requirements of healthcare today.

Through customer feedback, they have learned that making evidence more useable for nurses, successfully tracking and forecasting performance, and removing obstacles to interdisciplinary relationships are issues often overlooked when considering a Magnet application.

In applying for Magnet, a facility needs to prove they are providing care driven by the most current research and evidence-based practice; that they are including new knowledge and innovation in their care.

Of 17 medical centers named to the 2012 US News Best Hospital in America Honor Roll, 12 are Magnet-recognized organizations.

These are the hospitals in which nurses want to work. They also want to work in a place that cares for them, that helps them balance their professional and personal lives. These are hospitals that thrive in nurse recruitment and nurse retention.

To learn more about bringing life balance to your facility, nurse recruitment and nurse retention strategies, and how to increase work life balance for nurses and healthcare professionals, go to my new SelfCare for HealthCare program. After you take a look, CONTACT ME DIRECTLY to talk about customizing this powerful program for your employees.