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Posts from July, 2012

Nursing News: Nurses Being Forced to Retire Directly Affecting Nurse Retention

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, July 26th, 2012

Each year the nursing profession loses a higher number of nurses to retirement than it can replace, and facilities are working to identify nurse retention strategies. While some nurses retire early to pursue other careers, it appears that there are ways to encourage nurses to remain in the profession.

A study conducted by June Marie Kirschling, DNS, RN, FAAN, examines nurse retention factors. She found that the biggest predictor of whether a nurse would continue to work rather than retiring was whether additional hours were added to his or her schedule. The most beneficial range was around 11 additional hours, with nurses being about 3 times as likely to stay when they were able to work about that many additional hours. Fewer hours additional still had a positive effect but it was less marked. When many more additional hours were offered, there was actually a negative effect, with nurses being about 11 times more likely to leave when 21 or more additional hours were added.

Beyond an additional 11 hours, the likelihood of nurses to leave the job increases significantly. When more than 21 hours are added, nurses were 10.99 times more likely to leave the job.

The desire to change hours had little effect on the predictability of nurses remaining in the profession when age was taken into consideration. Older nurses were less likely than younger nurses to remain in the profession for the next five years.

To learn more effective nurse retention strategies, contact me today at leann@leannthieman.com.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

 

Nursing News: Nurses Need to Share Their Stories

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, July 24th, 2012

One of the best ways to develop a sense of community is to create occasions for nurses to tell their stories. Too often nursing staff know little about one another, personally and professionally. Staff meetings and social gatherings are great opportunities for nursing staff to tell something about themselves, and what is important to them in their work and home lives.

Question to increase camaraderie among your nursing staff:nursing community

  • When did you decide you wanted to be a nurse?
  • Who or what influenced you the most?
  • Are your original hopes and goals for being a nurse still being fulfilled now?
  • What could change that?
  • What is one of your favorite patient care stories?

Sharing stories not only builds community at work, but reminds us why we joined this benevolent profession…and why we stay.

To learn more ways to inspire your nurses, contact me at leann@leannthieman to set up a phone call.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

Nursing News: Developing a Sense of Community is Crucial to Nursing Professionals

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, July 19th, 2012

Developing a sense of community is important when you consider that nursing professionals often spend as much time with one another as they do with family members.  During tough times like we are experiencing in healthcare today, it is important for leaders to place an emphasis on building community, camaraderie, and a sense of teamwork in the workplace. Having a sense of community also helps with work life balance, a major struggle for most nurses.Nurse community

Nursing research proves that nurses have an innate need to feel connected and valued; that they belong to a larger whole. To foster this positive work environment it is crucial to develop a shared vision consensus among members in the purpose of work and common values.

Every nurse must feel like a valued member of the team and recognized for the unique gifts they bring.  To build community, nurse leaders should recognize these individual differences and capitalize on each person’s strengths.

Strong communities are also built in an environment of trust, where gossip and criticism are not tolerated.

To learn more ways to strengthen your team, contact me today at leann@leannthieman.com.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

 

Nursing News: Young Men and Women Are Joining the Nursing Profession in Record Numbers

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, July 17th, 2012

Young adults are joining the nursing profession in record numbers – good news for my beloved industry! Between 2002 and 2009, there was a 62% increase in the number of nurses ages 23 – 26 entering the field, according to a December 2011 Health Affairs report. Most college nursing schools have waiting lists of qualified and eager applicants.Nurse speaker

There are a number of reasons for this surge of young nurses. Aggressive nurse recruitment campaigns are marketing the positive aspects of the profession. Colleges and universities have ramped up their nursing education programs. Federal support for the development of nurses has increased.

The economy has also had an impact. Nursing is consistently ranked among the professions with the highest projected job growth in the next 20 years.

These factors have help stem the tide of a projected nursing shortage. A new generation of nurses brings fresh skills, knowledge and enthusiasm to their jobs and the workplace.

Contact me today about my proven nurse recruitment and retention programs at leann@leannthieman.com.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

 

Nursing News: Nurse Retention Bombshell – New Nurses Bailing Out Quickly

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, July 10th, 2012

It’s estimated that 255 of first year nurses quit. This lack of nurse retention and turnover remains a huge cost and source of frustration for hospital managers. It’s often hard to find these skilled clinicians, and therefore annoying when they quit, just when they should be settling into their new careers. Disappointed HR staff must start the process anew and with no more assurances of retaining the next, new recruit.nurse recruitment

Beyond the hard-and-fast cost of finding and onboarding replacements or hiring temps, first-year nurse turnover impacts patient care. It also signals larger workforce management issues, most notably a failure to engage employees and sell them on the mission.

There are theories about why first-year nurses quit. Perhaps some weren’t trained well in school, and feel ill-prepared for the life-and-death work in a hospital setting. Some have unrealistic expectations that do not match on-the-job realities. Some nurses get better offers elsewhere for their skills. Many quit to find the work-life balance they not only request but demand.

To learn what you can do to reduce first-year turnover and retain nurses, contact me at leann@leannthieman.com.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

 

Nursing News: Shared Governance Is an Effective Nurse Retention Tool

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, July 5th, 2012

Developing shared governance can empower direct care nurses to make decisions about their practice and take more responsibility. It has been shown to increase nurse retention and employee satisfaction, improve safety, patient experience and satisfaction, reduce lengths of stay, and result in a more robust bottom line.

Every nurse wants to work in an organization that has a healthy work environment, where team members work collaboratively and collegially, and where nurses make decisions about the way nursing care is delivered and measured for continuous improvement.

Ensuring such an environment is simpler if organizations adopt a shared governance structure that empowers direct care nurses and other healthcare workers to be involved in decision making around patient care in all practice settings.

The model of shared governance also engages shared leadership based on the principles of partnership, equity, accountability, and ownership at the point of service.

Shared governance has been proven to increase nurse retention. To learn more ways to increase nurse retention and recruit the nurses you need contact me at leann@leannthieman.com.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

Nursing News: 55% of Nurses are Obese – What does this Say about Our Work Life Balance?

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, July 3rd, 2012

nurse recruitment and retentionWhen researchers at the University of Maryland’s School of Nursing found that 55% of nurses were obese, they made suggestions for managers and health care executives to help nurses who are stressed, overweight and at risk for health problems achieve better work life balance by getting active, getting better sleep, having access to healthier foods, and managing stress.

Researchers stated that vigilance required for providing good nursing care depends on having an adequate sleep and rest. They found that long work hours can impact the quality of nursing care and increase the potential for error.

For the study, they randomly surveyed 633 nurses working in hospitals in Illinois and North Carolina. The findings, titled “Nurses’ Work Schedule Characteristics, Nurse Staffing, and Patient Mortality,” found that although 12-hour shifts might be appealing to many nurses, shift work in general can lead to sleep deprivation.

The findings suggest that long work hours can lead to poor patient care and outcomes. The findings from the researchers found nurses are more prone to errors from working long hours and lack of time off.  This data gives even more reason for providers in hospitals and clinics to care for their nurses.

To learn more ways to care for your nurses, to increase retention and patient satisfaction, contact me at leann@leannthieman.com.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.