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Posts from May, 2012

Nursing News: Improving the Nursing Work Environment Has Far-Reaching Benefits

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, May 29th, 2012

Hospitals could improve patient satisfaction, care quality, and nurse retention by improving the nursing work environment, reports a new study in British Medical Journal.

For the study, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing researchers surveyed 61,168 nurses and 131,318 patients at more than 1,000 hospitals in the United States and Europe. The surveys found that nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction were “common” in both parts of the world and that about 60% of hospital patients on average were satisfied with their care.

Based on the survey findings, researchers determined that hospitals with better nursing work environments—such as better nurse-to-patient ratios, nurse involvement in decision-making, and positive nurse-physician relations—were more likely to have high patient satisfaction scores. Those hospitals’ patients were more likely to recommend them to other patients.

The researchers also determined that better nursing work environments were associated with a lower likelihood of nurse burnout.

Workplace improvements may provide a relatively inexpensive method to boost care quality, patient satisfaction scores, and nurse retention.

What are your nurse retention strategies? Call me today at 970-223-1574 to talk about my powerful nurse retention programs.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

Nursing News: Safety in Nursing on the Rise

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, May 24th, 2012

There’s positive news when it comes to safety in nursing. A recent American Nurses Association survey found that RN work environments are safer than a decade ago, but nurses’ top three concerns remain the same: stress and overwork, musculoskeletal injury, and catching an infection.

According to the group’s 2011 Health and Safety Survey of 4,614 RNs, more hospitals provide patient lifting equipment and needles with safety devices, and fewer nurses are physically and verbally abused on-the-job.

However, 80% of respondents said they continued to work despite frequent neck, back, or shoulder pain, and 13% reported three or more on-the-job injuries within a year, up from 7% in 2001. Meanwhile, typical shift lengths have increased, with 56% of respondents reporting that a normal shift lasts 10 or more hours, compared with 48% in 2001. However, 55% of RNs said they worked 40 hours per week or more, down from 64% in 2001.

ANA states that safe work environments are crucial to maintaining an adequate nursing workforce. About 60% of RNs surveyed said safety concerns and stressful working conditions influence their decision to continue practicing in the nursing field.

My SelfCare for Healthcare  program teaches nurses how to care for the mind, body and spirit. Email me at leann@leannthieman.com to set up a time chat.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

 

Nursing News: Nursing Workforce Answered the Call for More Education

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, May 22nd, 2012

The release of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM), “Future of Nursing” report stimulated conversations about raising the educational level of the nursing workforce. Enrollment in nursing programs increased last year, as more nurses answered the call to advance their education.

According to new data released by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), enrollment in undergraduate nursing programs increased by 5.1 percent in 2011. At the same time, enrollment in PhD nursing programs increased by 7.9 percent over the previous year.

Though it is good news that nursing schools are expanding their student capacity, 75,587 qualified applicants were still turned away last year. The top reasons reported include:

  • Insufficient clinical teaching sites (65.2 percent)
  • Lack of faculty (62.5 percent)
  • Limited classroom space (46.1 percent)
  • Insufficient preceptors (29.4 percent)
  • Budget cuts (24.8 percent).

IOM’s report called for at least 80% of the nursing workforce to hold a baccalaureate degree by 2020 and a doubling of the number of nurses with doctorates. AACN believes that implementing the IOM recommendations will drive the nursing profession forward; moreover, high levels of education will better position nurses to become full partners in reforming healthcare delivery systems.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

 

Healthcare Industry News: OSHA Creates New Program to Educate and Protect Nurses

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, May 17th, 2012

I have good news to report from the healthcare industry: OSHA has begun a National Emphasis Program (NEP) for nursing and residential care facilities that is focused on blood exposures, ergonomics injuries related to lifting patients, communicable diseases such as tuberculosis, workplace violence, and slips and falls.

An NEP brings outreach and inspections to bear on specific hazards of an industry for a three-year period. OSHA said 2010 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed nursing and residential care facilities “experienced one of the highest rates of lost workdays due to injuries and illnesses of all major American industries. The incidence rate for cases involving days away from work in the nursing and residential care sector was 2.3 times higher than that of all private industry as a whole, despite the availability of feasible controls to address hazards,” it said.

“The data further indicate that an overwhelming proportion of the injuries within this sector were attributed to overexertion as well as to slips, trips and falls. Taken together, these two categories accounted for 62.5 percent of cases involving days away from work within this industry in 2010.”

“These are people who have dedicated their lives to caring for our loved ones when they are not well. It is not acceptable that they continue to get hurt at such high rates,” said Dr. David Michaels, assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. “Our new emphasis program for inspecting these facilities will strengthen protections for society’s caretakers.”

Hopefully this information will help us take better care of our nurses and protect the people who dedicate their lives to the healthcare industry.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

 

Nursing News: Shared Governance Increases Nurse Retention and Patient Satisfaction

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, May 15th, 2012

Developing a shared governance structure empowers direct care nurses to make decisions and take more responsibility. This has been shown to increase nurse retention and employee satisfaction, improve safety and patient satisfaction, reduce lengths of stay, and result in an increased bottom line.

Every nurse wants to work in an organization that has a healthy work environment, where team members work collaboratively and collegially, and where nurses make decisions about the way care is practiced, delivered, and measured for continuous improvement.

Ensuring such an environment is simpler if organizations adopt a formal shared governance structure that empowers direct care nurses and other healthcare workers to be involved in decision making about patient care in all practice settings. Shared governance is a proven strategy for nurse retention.

Email me today to talk about how to create healthy work environments and increase retention at your facility – LeAnn@LeAnnThieman.com.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

Nursing News: Alaska Leading the Way to Recruit Nurses

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, May 10th, 2012

Alaska can be proud of its effort to grow and recruit nurses. In addition to the University of Alaska Anchorage’s nursing program, the RRANN (Recruitment and Retention of Alaska Natives into Nursing) program increases the number of Alaska Natives and American Indians graduating with associate or bachelor degrees in nursing.nurse recruitment

A lot of the students are from villages or smaller towns and they are assisted with negotiating the big university system, which can be overwhelming. The program offers tutoring, networking opportunities, scholarships and one-on-one academic counseling. Students who take advantage of those offerings are eligible for a small stipend.

Many graduates of the program end up working at the University Hospital or returning to their home communities, where their patients benefit from a local nurse’s knowledge of the culture and where they are a valued part of the community.

How can your hospital grow its own nurses? Visit www.NurseRecruitmentandRetention.com for free resources or contact me directly to talk about your nurse recruitment strategy.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

Nursing News: Nurses Postponing Retirement, Affecting Nurse Recruitment and Aiding the Nursing Shortage

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, May 8th, 2012

Nurse retention Many nurses have not retired on the date they had always planned, which could be a reason nurse recruitment has fallen by the wayside, but is also a big issue when it comes to the nursing shortage. During the past 35 years, the number of nurses older than 50 more than quadrupled, and the number of nurses ages 35 to 49 doubled, according to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, an independent, nongovernment organization. Older and middle-aged nurses now represent almost three-quarters of the nursing work force. The average age of registered nurses is 47.

Forward-thinking hospitals and organizations are planning now for the inevitable exodus of nurses within the next 10-15 years. Many are cultivating a “pipeline” of nurses to meet the anticipated needs and increasing their nurse recruiting efforts.

What is your hospital’s plan for the future? Call me today to talk about my programs that increases nurse retention and nurse recruitment – 970-223-1574.

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.

Healthcare News: Healthcare Industry Still Growing despite Economic Challenges

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, May 2nd, 2012

healthcare jobsThe Healthcare Industry is one of our country’s fastest-growing, surviving the economy’s plunge in 2008 and prospering in the years since. Between 2007 and September 2011, while U.S. non-farm employment plummeted 4.7%, employment in healthcare actually grew 8.8%.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that healthcare and social assistance, along with professional and businesses services, will generate 8.2 million jobs by 2018, more than half the increase in total employment.

The evidence is clear on employment websites. There are numerous openings around the region for physicians (both primary care and specialists, particularly in rural areas), nurses, certified nursing assistants, technicians (radiology, surgery, and ultrasound), medical assistants and home health aides. There are positions related to healthcare, such as food service workers and information technology workers.

Have hope! All the evidence within the healthcare industry says nurses are and will continue to be in demand!

As a nurse speaker, I specialize in nurse recruitment, nurse retention, and work life balance and can help improve morale, retention and recruitment. CONTACT ME TODAY to talk about my powerful keynotes, workshops and programs. I look forward to helping your organization achieve its goals.