Blog

Posts from November, 2011

Nurses May Need More Education and Technology

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 30th, 2011

According to current statistics, nursing still remains a highly desirable career choice with plenty of future growth potential.

So why can’t I find a job? some ask.  Many of today’s nursing positions are calling for higher education and knowledge of technology. The nursing shortage is projected to continue for many years to come.   With more candidates in the marketplace and employers requiring specific skills, it can be difficult to get a job today, especially for new grads, eager to be recruited.

Adding business courses, technology, informatics, or even an advanced  degree can make you more marketable.

With the right combination of nursing education/background and professionalism, coupled with good communication and interviewing skills, many will find a job in today’s economy.

To learn more about how I can help recruit the nurses you need and retain the nurses you have, and to have me speak for your organization, contact me.

Advanced Practice Nurses Caring for More Patients

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 22nd, 2011

Hospitals nationwide are turning to advanced-practice nurses to care for patients more and more.

Among the factors contributing to this trend: An anticipated shortage of primary-care doctors, reductions in hours residents are allowed to work, and an expected increase in demand for medical services by aging baby boomers as well as people who will be newly insured through health care reform.r of reasons, industry experts say.

Nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) earn at least a master’s degree from an accredited program. Both are in strong demand and can command healthy salaries.

Forbes magazine recently named physician assistant programs the No. 1 master’s degree for getting a job, citing an expected growth of 39 percent by 2018.

To learn how I can help recruit the nurses you need and retain the nurses you have, contact me.

 

Johnson & Johnson Helps Recruit and Retain Nurses

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 16th, 2011

The Johnson & Johnson Campaign for Nursing’s Future – launched by Johnson & Johnson in February 2002, is designed to enhance the image of the nursing profession, recruit new nurses and nurse faculty, as well as help retain nurses currently in the profession.The Campaign will mark its 10th anniversary in 2012 and has invited nurses to participate it its “Portrait of Thanks” Mosaic Project. A photo mosaic – a compilation of different pictures to create a single image – is being created to celebrate the nursing profession and inspire the next generation of nurses and will be unveiled next year. For every photo submitted for the mosaic through February 1, 2012, the Campaign will donate $1 to the Foundation of the National Student Nurses’ Association (FNSNA) to help fund nursing student scholarships. Learn more at www.CampaignforNursing.com/PortraitofThanks . For more information on the Johnson & Johnson Campaign for Nursing’s Future, visit www.campaignfornursing.com and www.discovernursing.com.

To learn ways I can help your recruit and retain nurses, contact me.

How to Recruit the Best Nurses

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 7th, 2011

Instead of posting  job openings on numerous online job boards, engage your staff in finding the right nurses. Ask them for recommendations.

Often the best nurses  are already employed and are not looking at want ads in the newspapers or online. They may be satisfied with their jobs and wouldn’t  hear about the position unless somebody tells them.

Gather your staff together. Ask them who they know who might be interested in the position. This not only attracts great candidates, but it honors the staff for their input and helps to create great teams.

This strategy is consistent with my EachOneReachOneNurse initiative. If every one of the 2 1/2 million nurses in the country recruits or retains one nurse, our shortage would be averted!

To hear more ways I can help your recruit and retain nurses, contact me.