Blog

Posts from November, 2010

The Future of Nursing

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 14th, 2010

In 2008, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM)  launched a two-year initiative to assess and transform the nursing profession, to create a blueprint for the future of nursing.

Through its deliberations, the committee developed four key messages:

  • Nurses should practice to the full extent of their education and training.
  • Nurses should achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education system that promotes seamless academic progression.
  • Nurses should be full partners, with physicians and other health care professionals, in redesigning health care in the United States.
  • Effective workforce planning and policy making require better data collection and information infrastructure.

Not only will these ideas improve patient care, it will improve nurse morale, recruitment and retention.

To learn more ways to recruit the nurses you need and retain the best nurse you have, contact me.

How Can Nurses Give Better Care?

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 9th, 2010

Every nurse wants to provide optimal patient care. Yet, on average, nurses spend just 30% of their time doing so.

Pat Rutherford, MS, RN,  Vice President at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement has several suggestions.

One strategy that makes a great difference is decreasing redundant documentation.

Another is moving supplies and equipment closer to where nurses are using them so they spend less time hunting and gathering.

A third is to move nursing workstations closer to where patients are.

Investing in these improvements will not only improve patient care and satisfaction, but nurse satisfaction too. This is the best way to recruit nurses and to retain nurses too.

To learn more ways to recruit and retain nurses, contact me. I’d love to speak to your hospital or organization to help you recruit the nurses you need and retain the best you have.

Do We Need Better Nursing Rations to Give Better Patient Care?

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 5th, 2010

Some regions of the country are trying to mandate nursing ratios to ensure adequate patient care. While those favoring mandated ratios are well-intended, Pat Rutherford, MS, RN, vice president, Institute for Healthcare Improvement (www.ihi.org)
thinks the strategy and methodology are flawed.

She contends that we need to optimize the working conditions for the nursing resources we currently have at the bedside and remove all of the inefficiencies and barriers that prevent nurses from providing optimal patient care.

We can remove the wasted time  and re-invest it  into activities that provide value for patients and family members. In TCAB, (Transforming Care at the Bedside) staff have redesigned key clinical processes, and on average, double staff time at the bedside.

So what makes more sense? Increasing the number of nurses on a shift, or doubling the amount of time nurses spend in direct patient care? Allowing nurses to care for patients always improves morale and satisfaction for nurses and patients.

This is the best way to recruit nurses into our profession and to retain nurses too.

To learn more strategies to recruit and retain nurses, contact me. I’d love to come speak at your hospital to increase nurse satisfaction and nurse recruitment and retention.

Nurses Spend Only 30% of Their Time Caring for Patients

Written by LeAnn Thieman, CSP, November 2nd, 2010

Here’s a great idea! Let’s let nurses spend more time caring for patients!

Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB) is a joint effort by the Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation and Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI.) The key goal of the  initiative is to increase the amount of time nurses spend with patients. (www.ihi.org.) The American Organization of Nurse Executives is also collaborating.

A large body of research shows that if nurses spend more time in direct patient care, clinical outcomes are better and complications are fewer.  The typical nurse spends only about 30 percent of her or his day in direct patient care. The rest of the time they are on the phone, looking for other staff or equipment, tracking down medications, charting at a central nurses’ station, running errands…well you know the rest.

Nurses entered our benevolent profession to care for people. Allowing us to do so increases morale and satisfaction. This is perhaps the greatest nurse retention tool.

To learn more strategies to recruit and retain nurses, contact me. I’d love to come speak at your hospital to increase nurse satisfaction, recruitment and retention.